Integrating biomarkers for the stratification of patients into insignificant and significant prostate cancer

Key Information

Cancer type: 
Prostate
Research Institution: 
UCD, Dublin
Grant Amount: 
€750,000
Start date: 
October 1, 2011
End date: 
September 30, 2014

Scientific Project Abstract

The incidence of low grade, indolent or insignificant prostate cancer has increased in recent years. However determining if they are truly indolent represents a significant problem. If better biomarkers were available it would give the clinician and patient the confidence in implementing Active Surveillance strategies and save the patient from the side effects of radical treatment strategies. Building on the Prostate Cancer Research Consortiums track record and experience in biomarker discovery and validation, this programme grant will address the clinically important question of identify ways which can distinguish between insignificant or indolent disease which does not need treatment and significant disease which does need to be treated. Harnessing the consortium critical mass it will investigate biomarkers from genes to proteins to pathological images across serum, urine, tissue available in its established bioresource. Making no assumptions about the data we will apply novel statistical methods to question the data and further investigate them using independent samples from our international collaborators. This programme aims to deliver a defined panel of biomarkers which can be used to identify patients with insignificant disease, ultimately impacting on the patients quality of life but also giving them the confidence to delay radical therapy.

For the non-scientist

One-line description: 
Investigating biological markers which can identify prostate cancer patients who require radical treatment, and those that do not
What this project involves: 

The incidence of low grade, indolent or insignificant prostate cancer has increased in recent years' however identification of these low grade prostate cancer patients represents a problem. Patients with low grade disease may be saved from radical treatment strategies and associated side effects if they can be identified. This project aims to identify a panel of markers which can be used to identify patients with insignificant disease and ultimately save or delay them from receiving radical therapy.