Prostate Health Checker

What do you know about prostate cancer? Many men aren't sure what their prostate is, where it is, what it does, or when to call a doctor if they think they might have a problem.

Take this short quiz and find out more about staying healthy and the signs of prostate cancer.

This is a tool provided by the Irish Cancer Society for information only and is not intended to replace a consultation with your doctor.

Question 1


What is the prostate gland?

*Please select an option.

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Question 1


What is the prostate gland?


Just so we are all on the one page: It is a small gland that is part of the male reproductive system. It is the shape and size of a walnut. It rests below your bladder and in front of your rectum. Running through your prostate is a tube that carries urine from your bladder through your penis. The prostate helps make some of the fluid in semen, which carries sperm from your testicles when you ejaculate.
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Question 2


How old are you?

*Please select an option.

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Question 2


How old are you?


The cause of prostate cancer is unknown at present but there are risk factors that can increase your risk of getting prostate cancer. As men grow older, the risk of prostate cancer increases. Prostate cancer mainly affects men over the age of 60.
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Question 3


What is your Body Mass Index?

*Please select an option.

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Question 3


What is your Body Mass Index?


If you don’t know, you can calculate your BMI HERE.

Being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk of having fast-growing prostate cancer or prostate cancer spreading.

Remember, apart from not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight is the most important thing you can do to prevent cancer.
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Question 4


Do you drink alcohol?

*Please select an option.

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Question 4


Do you drink alcohol?


Drinking any amount of alcohol increases the risk of cancer. The more alcohol you drink, the higher the risk of developing cancer.

You can limit your risk by drinking no more than 2 standard drinks per day if you are a man and 1 standard drink per day if you are a woman.
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Question 5


Do you smoke?

*Please select an option.

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Question 5


Do you smoke?


Tobacco contains many cancer-causing chemicals and other toxins which have a damaging effect on your health. Smoking is a known risk factor for cancer and other life-threatening diseases in both men and women.
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Question 6


Do you take regular exercise (at least 30 minutes of moderate activity 5 times a week)?

*Please select an option.

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Question 6


Do you take regular exercise (at least 30 minutes of moderate activity 5 times a week)?


Being physically active can reduce the risk of prostate cancer. 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day offers the most protection against prostate cancer.

Being active is safe and possible for many people with cancer, both during and after treatment. It can also help recovery by relieving some side effects.

Being active may also help men who have had prostate cancer to live longer. Research suggests that a moderate amount of activity for at least 3 hours a week may reduce the risk of prostate cancer coming back. Speak to your doctor before you start any kind of exercise plan, especially if you have other health problems.
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Question 7


Is there a history of prostate cancer in your father, brother, or blood-related uncle?

*Please select an option.

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Question 7


Is there a history of prostate cancer in your father, brother, or blood-related uncle?


If a close relative (father or brother) has had prostate cancer, you are more likely to get this cancer. The more family members affected and the younger they were, the greater the chance of a family link.

If you have a family history of prostate cancer you should discuss this with your doctor. You should also tell your doctor if you have family members known to carry the BRCA gene, as men with the BRCA mutation have an increased risk of prostate and other cancers.

If you have a family history it is advisable to see your doctor when you are in your 40s for a prostate check.
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Question 8


What is your ethnic group?

*Please select an option.

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Question 8


What is your ethnic group?


Did you know men of African-American and African-Caribbean descent have a higher risk of prostate cancer than other ethnic groups?

If you are in your 40s discuss this risk with your doctor.
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Question 9


Do you eat more than 500g / 1lb of cooked red meat a week or more than 70g / 2.5oz of processed meats a day? (I.e. those preserved by smoking, curing, salting or adding preservatives, such as smoked salmon, sausages, bacon, ham)

*Please select an option.

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Question 9


Do you eat more than 500g / 1lb of cooked red meat a week or more than 70g / 2.5oz of processed meats a day?


Meat is an important source of protein, iron and other nutrients. However, there is evidence to suggest that eating too much red meat, may increase your risk of prostate cancer. A good guide is to eat red meat (beef, lamb and pork) no more than 2-3 times a week. Eat more cooked chicken, turkey, fish and non-meat protein sources instead.

There is strong scientific evidence to suggest that avoiding processed meats or eating no more than 70g a day can help reduce your risk of prostate cancer.
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Question 10


Do you normally consume 5-7 servings of fruit and vegetables a day?

*Please select an option.

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Question 10


Do you normally consume 5-7 servings of fruit and vegetables a day?


Fruit and vegetables are generally low in calories and fat, and high in vitamins, minerals and fibre. They also contain nutrients (e.g. antioxidants and flavonoids) that protect cells in the body from damage that can lead to cancer. Eat 5 to 7 portions of fruit and vegetables a day. Use fresh, tinned (in natural juices with no added salt or sugar) or frozen fruit and vegetables. Try to eat whole fruits and vegetables more often. Eat a variety of different coloured fruit and vegetables.
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Question 11


Do you eat foods and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt every day? (Biscuits, chocolate, cake, sweets, crisps, ice cream, sugary drinks)

*Please select an option.

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Question 11


Do you eat foods and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt every day? (Biscuits, chocolate, cake, sweets, crisps, ice cream, sugary drinks)


Foods high in fat, sugar and salt, and drinks high in sugar are not needed for good health and should not be eaten every day. Very small amounts once or twice a week is enough.

Avoiding these foods will help you to maintain a healthy body weight, which reduces your risk of cancer.
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Question 12


Symptoms of prostate cancer: Difficulties when going to the toilet.

Do you:
  • Have difficulty passing urine?
  • Feel like you stop and start while passing urine?
  • Need to pass urine more often than usual, especially at night?
  • Feel like you have not completely emptied your bladder after passing urine?
  • Have pain or discomfort when passing urine?
  • Have blood in your urine?
  • Have a change in bowel habits?

*Please answer all options.

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Question 12


Symptoms of prostate cancer


These symptoms can be caused by a number or different medical conditions, but they can also be caused by prostate cancer. If you notice any of these changes, please talk to your doctor.

Often, early stage prostate cancer has no symptoms and men with prostate cancer often do not have any of these changes. These symptoms may be caused by prostate cancer or they may be caused by other conditions, such as a harmless (benign) growth of the prostate gland called benign prostatic hyperplasia or enlarged prostate. For more information follow the link to our website at the end of this quiz.
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Question 13


Other symptoms of prostate cancer

Do you:
  • Have pain or discomfort in your lower back, hips or pelvis?
  • Have unexplained weight loss?
  • Often get fatigue?
  • Have trouble getting or keeping an erection?

*Please answer all options.

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Question 13


Other symptoms of prostate cancer


These symptoms can be caused by a number or different medical conditions, but they can also be caused by prostate cancer. If you notice any of these changes, please talk to your doctor.

Often, early stage prostate cancer has no symptoms and men with prostate cancer often do not have any of these changes. These symptoms may be caused by prostate cancer or they may be caused by other conditions, such as a harmless (benign) growth of the prostate gland called benign prostatic hyperplasia or enlarged prostate. For more information follow the link to our website at the end of this quiz.
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Question 14


Have you ever had tests for prostate cancer?
  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test
  • A digital rectal examination (DRE):

*Please answer all options.

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Question 14


Tests for prostate cancer


Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test: Measures the level of a substance called PSA in the blood. A raised PSA level can be caused by cancer but it can be raised for other reasons, so you may also need a biopsy and/or a scan. 2 out of 3 men with a raised PSA who go on to have a prostate biopsy do not have prostate cancer. Some men with prostate cancer do not have a raised PSA level.

If you are over 70 and have no symptoms your doctor may not think it is advisable to have your PSA tested. This is due to the slow growing nature of prostate cancer and may not cause any problems.

A digital rectal examination (DRE): A doctor will feel your prostate gland by putting a gloved finger into your rectum (back passage). The doctor will feel if the prostate gland is enlarged or abnormal.

If prostate cancer is found to be slow-growing, treatment may not be needed, the cancer may be closely monitored instead.

Prostate cancer can be treated very successfully if it’s found early. Many men live for a long time after treatment and most men do not die from prostate cancer. Therefore it is very important to see your doctor for a prostate check.
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Thank you

Thank you for taking part in the Irish Cancer Society Online Prostate Health Checker.

Remember this checklist is not a substitute for a doctor. If you are concerned about your prostate health, please visit your doctor, regardless of what results you have on our checklist.

If you are over 50 and have no symptoms you still should have a discussion with your doctor about the risks of prostate cancer.

For more information call our Cancer Nurseline Freephone 1800 200 700 and speak to one of our cancer nurses for confidential advice, support and information.

For more information on prostate cancer: www.cancer.ie/prostate (Open in a new window)

You may find it helpful to print your results and bring them with you to your doctor.

Why not share the checklist with your family and friends?

Your results

This online prostate health checker has been created by the Irish Cancer Society to assist the community in monitoring their prostate health.

This is a tool provided by the Irish Cancer Society for information only and is not intended to replace a consultation with your doctor.

Symptoms:

  • No Symptoms

For more information call our Cancer Nurseline Freephone 1800 200 700 and speak to one of our cancer nurses for confidential advice, support and information.